9. How did you get into Camp America?

I think I have filled in the application for camp America 5 times now but this was the first year I actually sent it off. For all of my summers in between school, uni and now I put my career first and went for design internships. Now that I have a year and a half of work under my belt and I’m taking a few months out to go traveling, it was finally the right time to give Camp America a proper try. The application process was simple and their website helped you through every step of the way but I thought I would just give a brief summary of what I had to do and how I ended up getting placed at a camp.

Online application

Of all the years that I have filled in the Camp America, this year was definitely the easiest. They split the form up into 7 clear categories…

  • Skills – Fill in 3 or more skills that you have that you would like to teach or be involved in at camp. I went for arts and drama based things but you can do anything from sports to cooking skills.
  • Availability – This is the date you can leave to go to camp and the day you have to be back for. The longer your availability is the higher chance you have of getting a place.
  • About Me – It is exactly what it says on the tin and covers other key experiences you need to go to camp like childcare experience, what languages you speak and if you have a driving license.
  • Camp Options – This is where you can pick the kind of camp you want to go to. Whether you are after the proper parent-trap wilderness experience or if a religious camp is up your street this is where you can decide what you want to get out of camp.
  • Education & Work History
  • Contact details

If you progress through this round then other sections open up such as Medical questions and passport details.

Pictures & Videos

If there is anything I can recommend it would be to make a video! I know it can be quite embarrassing to sit in front of a camera but this is the best way to get attention of camps. It doesn’t have to be long and it can be as creative as you like but just get across your bubbly personality and what key skills you can bring forward. If you don’t feel comfortable with that then add lots of action photos doing what you have said you can do, such as pictures of you playing sport or examples of art work you have done.

References

You need 2 references from anyone that can vouch for you but isn’t a relative. This can be a manager at work, a teacher from uni/school or a leader in a club you work at, for example. I asked my uni tutor and one of my managers at work to do it which all worked perfectly well!

Fees

You have to pay an application fee to begin with of around £180. As you progress more fees come though such as assessment and confirmation fees which all together add up to £214.

You get paid at camps but the amount varies from camp to camp and your food and accommodation will often be covered. This means the only other additional fees would be flights and any excursions you want to go on when you’re at the camp.

Interview

If your application is successful then you will have to go for a short interview with a member of the Camp America team local to you. I met my interviewer in a cafe in London and it lasted for around an hour. One thing I really want to stress is this is nothing to worry about, they are on your side and want to help you get to camp! We essentially built upon my application and she wanted to get a better grasp of my personality. I had a chance to ask her lots of questions about her own experience at camp and it ultimately felt like more of a chat with a friend than a serious interview.

Medical Form

After you interview you will need to print off and get your doctor to fill in a short medical form. GPs can be very busy so make sure you give yourself plenty of time for this!

The wait begins…

After all this it is time to wait for any requests from camps to come through. If you want the best chance of getting seen then make sure you

  • have skills down that you have plenty of strong experience in
  • get photos/videos up
  • change your preferences to all types of camps (but remember you have to go so make sure it is something you will still enjoy/feel comfortable at)

If it all works out you may get an email from a camp asking for a Skype interview!

Skype Interview

With the time difference between England and America, my interview was one evening after work. Be sure to do lots of research into the camp before you go so you can ask plenty of questions about them and see if it is the right fit for you. My interview lasted about an hour and they asked me about my skills, my personality, what I want out of a camp and why I wanted to go to their camp specifically. I think it is important to stay be relaxed and, as cliche as it sounds, just be yourself. I was offered the job of Photography Specialist from the camp at the end of my interview and of course I accepted. From here I was sent a conformation email where I had to formally accept the offer.

Next Steps

After you have been placed at a camp the last stages are getting your flights and Visa sorted. I haven’t actually got around to these steps yet so I can’t be of much assistance but I did receive a really helpful information pack from Camp America explaining all the stages of applying for a Visa. Once I have done it all I will be sure to update this post!

I know this seems like a lot of stages but I promise none of them take long to do and it is all worth it for that feeling you get when an offer from a camp comes through! If you have any other questions please feel free to ask them below.

Merry Christmas and happy travels!

Go and grab another cuppa on me, Em x

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3. Have you thought about packing?

When it comes to packing I am playing a total guessing game. I have never been on a long trip like this before and I think that it is all going to be trial and error. For that reason I am trying to keep everything limited and cheap so that if I do end up with too much I wont be heart broken leaving anything behind. I have read lots of packing blog posts off Pinterest from people who have already been traveling and this is what I have concluded to be the best list of what to bring.

Packing Basics

Choosing to go away at the start of January has many perks. For example, new year, new me, it is a great way to escape the harsh winter of England and I can use Christmas as a chance to get a few of the things I need for my trip. I haven’t actually got around to packing yet, but I did add some key items to my list to Santa this year:

  1. Backpack
  2. Packing Cubes
  3. First Aid Kit
  4. Towel
  5. Travel Adapter
  6. Luggage Locks
  7. Travel Sewing Kit
  8. Drinking Straws
  9. Filter Bottle
  10. Hot/Cold food container
  11. Scruba Wash Bag
  12. Portable Charger
  13. Eye mask
  14. Travel pillow
  15. Deck of cards
  16. Notebook/diary
  17. Torch

I am not by any means be expecting all of this to be gifted to me so after christmas I will purchase anything, that I am missing, myself.

Clothes/Shoes

There are obviously lots of other basics I will need such as clothes and shoes but I am just going to reuse everything I have in the back of my cupboard instead on investing in new things. If you want a basic plan however I am planning on bringing:

  1. 4 x t-shirts/vest tops
  2. 2 x shorts
  3. 1x maxi skirt
  4. 2 x summer dresses
  5. 7 x underwear
  6. 2 x swim wear
  7. 1 x light jumper
  8. 1 x light raincoat
  9. Flip flops
  10. Trainers

Toiletries

The next thing to think about is toiletries. I am trying to keep this minimal and as eco friendly as I can so I don’t cause more damage to the beautiful places I am going to see. I hardly ever way make up at home so i am limiting myself to absolute basics just incase of the odd night out.

  1. Shampoo bar
  2. Body soap
  3. Deodorant
  4. Bug repellent
  5. Sun cream
  6. Face wash
  7. Mascara
  8. Pencil eye liner
  9. Eyebrow Powder
  10. Concealer stick
  11. Super glue (you never know when this will come in handy!) 

Electronics

I don’t want to be lugged down by heavy electronics so I am going to limit myself to the absolute basics that I know I will use daily:

  1. Phone
  2. Camera
  3. Kindle
  4. Earphones
  5. Charging cables

As I said this is a total guessing game for me now so I will be sure to do an updated list of what I actually used when I get back.

Merry Christmas and happy travels!

Go and grab another cuppa on me, Em x

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My Hostel survival guide

HOW TO PICK A HOSTEL

Every morning, as my 6:20 alarm blasted in my ear, I had the same thought. I need a holiday. It was hard to lock down anyone else to go with me so I made the decision to simply go alone. I hopped straight onto Air BnB, found a whole apartment with a stunning view over Dubrovnik old town and booked in 3 nights in May. I couldn’t have been more excited and pictured myself, glass of wine in hand, watching the sun set over the sea. What more could I possibly want?

As the day went on however the doubts started to creep in. Is it safe to stay on my own? Is it a long walk away from the centre of town? Will this mean that I literally don’t communicate at all with another human being for 4 whole days? Is this really the smartest decision?

I have stayed in loads of Air BnBs before, so it felt familiar to me and I didn’t want to splash out on a hotel but whenever the word ‘hostel’ popped up I just pictured sharing dirty bunk beds with drunken strangers and going home with athletes’ foot from the showers (slightly dramatic I know!). It is sad to say but I knew it wouldn’t be that safe for me to stay alone in a whole apartment in a place I wasn’t familiar with, so I cancelled my Air BnB, got over my fear of foot bunions, and started browsing Hostel World instead.

Just like I would when picking any accommodation for a trip, I evaluated the following factors and then ordered them from 1 (absolute necessity) to 8 (not fussed about compromising on). This way I could filter down the endless list of hostels easier:

  1. Location
  2. Cleanliness
  3. Safety
  4. Price
  5. Common area (space to socialise)
  6. Amenities (kitchen/ washing machine/ bathrooms)
  7. Amount of people in room
  8. Single gender/Mixed

The things I was most concerned about were location, cleanliness and safety so I browsed the map to find hostels inside the city walls and then compared the ratings of cleanliness and safety for each hostel. I wasn’t actually fussed about staying in a mixed room, but it was nice to know that some places do provide the option of single sex rooms if that would make you feel more comfortable. I spent a good day and half reading reviews, looking at pictures and comparing prices until I decided on the best hostel for me. I know that everyone says the excitement of traveling is  being able to ‘live in the moment’ but if it is your first time in a hostel and you’re a bit nervous then there is no harm in taking time to find one that you’re going to feel comfortable in.

TOP TIP: if you are traveling alone then look for rooms with an odd number of beds (3,5,7) as that often means they will have one single bed amongst the double beds, this way you may not have to bunk with a total stranger.

 

HOW TO GET COMFORTABLE AND SOCIALISE

I remember walking into my 5 bed room for the first time and being genuinely surprised with how clean, airy and pretty it was! It was empty when I got there but there were 4 open suitcases on the floor. I have to admit that was the most nerve-wracking time of the whole holiday for me, I felt like I couldn’t really relax until I knew who was going to be sleeping within 5 feet of me. Naturally my mind jumped to images of serial killers and smelly, drunk lunatics but I was quickly brought back to reality when 3 English boys on a break from University and an American girl discovering Europe bounded in to say hello. It is easy to forget that 95% of people in hostels are welcoming, friendly travellers in exactly the same shoes as you and not Ted Bundy enthusiasts with a rope under their pillow!

Naturally social situations have never been a problem for me but being in a foreign country with a room full of strangers did throw me a bit! If you feel anxious about just how to socialise with your new roomies (or anyone you come across in the hostel for that matter) then here are a few ice breaking conversation starters that really helped me to settle in…

  1. Where are you from?
  2. How long have you been here for?
  3. What have been your highlights of the city/location you’re in?
  4. Are you traveling anywhere else after this?
  5. I am starving, any recommendations on where to eat?
  6. Do you know where the bathroom/kitchen is?
  7. I am glad to be away from the rain in England, what’s the weather been like here?
  8. I’m really excited to see/visit the ____, have you been there yet?

It can be incredibly daunting starting conversations and if you really struggle with social situations then look for hostels with smaller or even private rooms and try and avoid any with ‘party’ in the name. I think I must’ve walked up and down the stairs from my room to the common area at least 4 times before I got the courage to actually go in and talk to people. There was quite a big crowd gathered in the lounge, so I initially headed to the kitchen and asked a girl cooking if the teabags were free to use. I made a quick joke about how typical it was that the first thing I do in a new country is make a cup of tea and that you can take the girl out of England but not the English out the girl. Luckily, she laughed and we then started a conversation about how much she wanted to visit London. She introduced me to the group and before I knew it 4 hours of discussing everything from travel to cows had passed and I felt right at home.

 

WHAT TO PACK

I know there are hundreds of lists online of essentials to pack when staying in a hostel but I thought I would give my top selection of game changers that I was very glad I had in my case…

  1. Padlock, everyone in my room was totally chilled but you can never be too sure so just bring a padlock so you can lock your valuables away in the lockers. I came to learn that padlocks with codes are better as a few people in my hostel had lost or muddled up their padlock keys and had to pay a fine to break the lockers open and retrieve their stuff.
  2. Money Belt, if lockers aren’t provided then get a comfy money belt that you can always keep your passport and money in, even when sleeping. Quick disclaimer: if you’re reading this before staying in a hostel and are now thinking “oh crap I don’t feel comfortable staying somewhere where I physically have to strap my valuables to my body” then please don’t fret! For my whole holiday I didn’t lock anything away and kept my passport and money in a bag under my bed with absolutely no fear of it getting taken as everyone in my room was so lovely. I am just putting this on my list because you never know, and it is better to be prepared and not use it rather than risk it and wish you had it.
  3. Flip Flops, great for avoiding the dreaded athletes’ foot and also for walking around the hostel in the evening in when you want to be a bit more relaxed.
  4. Small Towel, most hostels don’t provide towels and also don’t have loads of room to hang things up to dry so just bring a small one that you can drape over your bed when it is wet and won’t take up much room.
  5. Extension lead, plugs can be hard to come by and you are normally limited to 1 per person so bring an extension lead. Then all you need is 1 wall plug and 1 adapter but you will have up to 4 sockets to charge your own things from.
  6. Comfy clothes, I found during the day everyone was out and about exploring but in the evenings we would all meet downstairs in the common room whilst some people cooked dinner and others just sat and socialised. It was such a game changer having some comfy shorts and a jumper to throw on!
  7. Sleeping mask, curtains aren’t always an option!
  8. Ear plugs, people snore!
  9. A book, although there was normally someone around to talk to, when the 4 o’clock “I need a break” time arrived for me I really enjoyed going back to the hostel and just relaxing in my bed with a book.
  10. Chocolate, food is a great way to make friends and snacks are just essential no matter what let’s be honest!

 

If you’re debating whether to stay in a hostel or not then my suggestion would be do some good research into finding one that is going to suit you, bring some snacks to share with your new roommates, pack your bag and just do it! They’re cheap and frequent enough in the big cities that if you’re not happy then simply move on to the next one or if worse comes to worse then you can just book an Air BnB for the night. I am so glad that I chose to stay in a hostel and I think I got really lucky that all of my roommates were lovely. I even ended up going on a day trip with one of the girls from the common room and I now consider her to be a good friend! I may have gone away on my own, but I was never alone and before long a room full of strangers felt like family.

If you have any more questions or any tips for me then please leave them below!

For anyone wondering I stayed in the Old Town Hostel in Dubrovnik and absolutely loved it! If you;re heading on a trip there then I couldn’t recommend it more as a place to stay and if you would like to know more about what to do in Dubrovnik then be sure to read my travel guide here!

Go and grab another cuppa on me, Em x

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Guide to Costa Rica : San Jose & Tortoguero

Pura Vida. In English “Pura Vida” is simply translated to “Pure Life” but in Costa Rica itself it means more than just words, it is a way of life. It means to live life with a smile, to embrace any new adventure but most importantly to find joy in the simple things in life. It shines out through any local you meet and gives the whole country a sense of peace and joy that I had never experienced before.

We landed in the capital city of San Jose where a friendly driver eagerly awaited to transfer us to our accommodation for the night, the Hotel Gran de Oro. The corridors were all laced with thick wooden panels and hanging plants dangled from every crevice. The building centred around a grand courtyard restaurant where we gathered for a quick snack before setting out to explore the capital. For me the highlight of San Jose was the National Theatre of Costa Rica, founded in 1897 it is one of the most breath-taking buildings I have ever seen and I would’ve loved the chance to experience a performance there under the hand painted dome and blinding chandelier.  Whist reflecting on the trip as whole, San Jose felt quite underwhelming, but it was interesting to learn more about the history and culture of the country at the National Museum of Costa Rica. It was a great kick-start to our holiday but I wouldn’t prioritise it as a place to spend a large chunk of your holiday in.

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The morning light brought with it our first introduction to a tropical down pour and I think the next 2 weeks were spent in a constant state of dampness. We drove for what felt like hours down bumpy country roads and past rushing waterfalls till we reached our transfer to Tortoguero at the local harbour. The boat sped through the winding rivers blanketed by dense tropical trees, an American Crocodile watched us with one beady eye from the bank, and before we knew it we were out of civilisation and into to the depths of the rainforest. We stayed at the Manatus hotel, named after the old manatee scientific monitoring station that used to be situated there, but we only had time to drop our bags off at our huts before heading back on the boat to the local town. I think if anywhere was to sum up “Pura Vida” it was the town of Tortoguero. It wasn’t a place of wealth or blinding beauty but children ran playfully down the streets whilst their parents gathered under corrugated shelters, sharing food and stories of days past. The sense of community was overwhelming; our tour guide lived locally and was welcomed by everyone with open arms and bright smiles. Even the gushing rain couldn’t dampen the carefree feeling that enchanted the town, it did however leave us shivering so we made our way back to the hotel to hide out from the storm.

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That night I was awoken to a noise that I can only compare to a hailstorm (well if boulders were falling form the sky).  The rain trickled silently down the window pains but above us came a whole series of crashes that made the entire roof shake. Had the risk of getting soaked not been so high I would have ventured out to investigate but it was a good job I didn’t. After raising the issue at breakfast the following morning I was told by a waiter it was a pack of howler monkeys that often used the metal roofs of the huts to crack open nuts and fruit for their dinner. Talk about noisy neighbours!

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For the rest of the day we got to experience the majesty that is the Costa Rican rainforest. All loaded onto the boat our guide Luis took us deep into the lush green canopy, his eyes so fine-tuned to the surroundings that he could spot even the most camouflaged of creature. Three fingered sloths draped from trees, giant Christ lizards lapped up the sun on overhang leaves and monkeys flew through the sky like trapeze artists in a circus.  There truly isn’t anything more captivating than seeing an animal in their natural habitat, though I definitely wouldn’t want to get any closer to the Caymans than we did.  The guided tour finished around lunchtime but our feet didn’t stay on solid ground for long. If I’m ever asked to recall my most memorable moment traveling this is always the one I turn to. Accompanied by my dad, we were kayaking back down the river when a rustle in the trees caught my attention. Camouflaged by his algae ridden fur the three toed sloth was certainly hard to spot but luckily, due to their laid back approach to life, we were able to sit and watch him for what felt like hours. I decided to call him Cedric.

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Tortoguero stands for the “Land of the Turtle”, something that we were lucky enough to experience first hand. Instead of a comfortable evening tucked up in bed, we clambered back onto the boat and sped across the river in the dead of night. Our destination was a beach on the edge of the national park. Our purpose was giant turtles. In the warmer months of the year, female turtles clamber upon the beach to lay 100s of their eggs in the sand. Seeing as turtles don’t have schedules we sat in a hut in the dark for around an hour or so before one was spotted. Following the glow of a red light (Turtles use the white moon light as a guide back to the ocean so torches aren’t allowed in case the turtles get them confused) we tiptoed across the beach. Deep in the sand lay a humongous female turtle who was kicking up a sand storm with her back legs. They dig holes in order to lay their eggs then fill them back in with sand to protect their children from predators. It was an emotional experience to then watch the mother turtle crawl back to the ocean knowing that only 1/1000 of her offspring have a chance of making it to adulthood. The people of Costa Rica put in a great effort to protect these beautiful creatures and it was such a humbling experience to see them in their natural surroundings and contribute to the cause.

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Just as quickly as we had arrived it was time to get back on the trusty boat once more and head out of Tortoguero.  The sound of the rainforest stayed with me long after my feet were back on solid ground though. The trickle of the rain, the rush of the boat along the river, the rustle of the wind through the trees and the constant hum of the life rummaging around the forest floor echoed through my ears. The calmness of Tortoguero amongst the madness of the environment it was situated in was something very special and after only 3 days there I can honestly say that I now truly understand the meaning of Pura Vida.

Go and grab another cuppa on me, Em x

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Honest guide to Disneyland Paris

February was a perfect month. I turned 21, got a 2:1 in my university coursework and I got to spend 4 amazing days in Disneyland Paris. Before leaving I read through hundreds of blog posts about Disney from booking to hotels, food to souvenirs and each one was more helpful than the one before so I thought I would add my own take on the happiest place on earth into the mix. Here is my honest guide to Disneyland Paris…

Dates – Before booking my trip I headed down to Thomson (now known as TUI I believe) and picked up a guide to Disneyland. Inside there was a helpful chart with a week by week guide to how busy the park would be throughout the year. Luckily for me one of the least busy weeks coincided with my reading week at uni so it was like it was meant to be! As you can imagine Disneyland is never going to be empty but I don’t think the crowds were too horrendous, on average we only had to queue for 30 mins and always had a decent view for the fireworks/parades. I would definitely recommend February as a good time to go just make sure you wrap up nice and warm!

Travel – I opted to take the Eurostar simply because it was slightly cheaper than flying and just felt like less of a hassle. We sped through passport control in St Pancras and before we knew it we were through the tunnel and into France. Overall it took about 2.45 hours and as soon as you step out the station you are a 5 minute walk away from the entrance to Disney. There was an option where you could pay to check in on the train so you could head straight to the parks but I didn’t pay for this as I didn’t mind going to the hotel and settling in a bit first before heading off to the castle! On our way home we were told to only leave 40 mins before our train left but THIS IS A LIE! The queue for customs was so long and we only just made our train so I would recommend heading to the station with at least an hour to spare

Hotel – We stayed in one of the new renovated rooms at the Disney Cheyenne hotel and, for the price we payed, I think it was lovely. Our room had an ensuite, with a shower and a bath, and 2 large double beds. It had air conditioning, heating and a large tv that played endless repeats of Thats So Raven so I really couldn’t complain. The hotel had a gift shop, a Starbucks, a bar and a buffet restaurant which we didn’t actually end up trying but it looked perfectly nice. It was a 10/15 minute walk from the parks or a 3 minute bus ride. I can imagine in peak season the buses would get very crowded and you may have to end up waiting around for one but seeing as the park was at its emptiest we never had to wait longer than 5 minutes for one. I really like the Cheyenne hotels wild west/toy story theme and would 100% stay there again!

Food – I was most worried about the food and how much it was going to cost me to simply not starve but I ended up being pleasantly surprised. Our hotel offered a buffet breakfast for a rather large cost so instead we chose to just go to Starbucks in the morning and grab a cup of tea and a croissant which turned out to be much more cost effective (and yummier I can imagine). Seeing as we didn’t have a weight limit on the Eurostar we stocked our bags up with lots of snacky foods like breakfast bars and biscuits to keep us going throughout the day. For lunches and diners we tended to opt for the quick service restaurants in which you could get a main (like a burger or hot dog), a side, a desert and a drink for around €15, if you chose off the set menu, which I thought was pretty reasonable and they were decent sized servings. Although food was the thing we spent the most on it wasn’t as extortionate as I had feared and there was definitely a great variety. I would highly recommend the chicken fajitas at the quick service restaurant opposite Big Thunder Mountain! Disney do offer meal plans but seeing as I didn’t use on I don’t feel like I know enough to comment on them but I will say that I didn’t leave wishing that I had got one.

Rides – As previously mentioned we got quite lucky with wait times and also took good advantage of the fast pass system that Disney offers. The biggest problem we faced however was rides closing down. We got to the front of the queue of Pirates of the Caribbean to have it shut down and I couldn’t ride Space Mountain until the last day as it always seemed to be closed. It was frustrating but in the end we did get to ride everything we wanted! The last time I went to Disney I was around 10 and lots of the rides hadn’t changed at all since then but in a way I think that just adds to the sentimental value of Disney for me. My top ride recommendations would be Buzz Lightyears Laser Blast, Big Thunder Mountain, Ratatouille and It’s a Small World simply for how bizarre it is. The only ride I would question would be Crush’s Coaster, it was fun but over very quickly considering we queued the longest for it out of any of the rides.

Souvenirs – Everywhere you turn you will see a gift shop and if you like Stitch then you are definitely in for a treat because he seemed to be everywhere! Even though there were lots of different shops I felt they all seemed to sell the same thing and Disney had clearly singled out a few films to focus their merch on. The most noticeable difference for me since the last time I went was just how much Star Wars stuff there was, it was everywhere! Just like the food I wasn’t as shocked by the prices of most things as I thought I would be but €5 for a pencil….come on now Disney. I ended up picking some pins and t-shirts to take home and am very impressed with the quality of them so although this sounds like I am ripping into the souvenirs I am not, I do think there are some great things you might just have to push past the racks of overpriced stationary to find them.

IMG_1862.JPGTop tips – Here are a few tips that I wish I had known before going on my trip to Disneyland Paris….

  1. Invest in the Photopass! Even though it was quite pricey (at around £40 I think) we will be forever laughing at some of the photos we got from the rides and are definitely great memories to treasure!
  2. Don’t feel like you can’t take some time to chill! You have spent a lot of money and want to get the full bang for your buck I know but we found that going back to the hotel for a couple of hours in the afternoon for a rest made our whole experience more enjoyable.
  3. Get a lanyard with a plastic card wallet on. I ended up buying one from the park for about €10 but it made it so much easier having our park tickets, hotel key, fast passes etc all in one place. Plus it was a great way to show off all those new pins!
  4. If there is a ride you really want to go on but the queues are too long, wait till when the parade is on then I guarantee the lines will be a lot shorter.
  5. Use a blank white photo frame to get signatures from characters then when you’re home you can add in one of your favourite photos and have all of the memories of the people you met shown off around it.
  6. Bring layers for the evening. If you’re planning on staying till the fireworks then keep an extra layer in your bag, especially if you’re going in the winter months, because you won’t enjoy the fireworks if you feel like a human ice cream.
  7. Secure a good spot for the parade early because there is nothing more annoying than having a 6ft 4 dad with a kid on his shoulders in front of you when you’re just trying to wave to Pluto from his float.
  8. If you’re meeting characters take videos as well as photos, you can get good stills from them and it’s also a great way to look back on the moment.
  9. The minnie mouse ears that Disney sells are made for kids heads so, I found them to be at least, very tight and very uncomfortable. Look into some pairs on Etsy before your trip, I got my Winnie the Pooh ones here and I love them. Plus it is a great way to connect with your favourite character if you’re wearing ears that represent them.
  10. Enjoy every moment of it because it honestly will be one of the most magical trip you go on no matter what age you are!

Go and grab another cuppa on me, Em x

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